[cs_content][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ _order=”0″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/1″ class=”cs-ta-left” style=”padding: 0px;”][x_blockquote cite=”” type=”left” class=”introduction”]Ben Dean-Titterrell returns with another update on what our MPs have been getting up to down in Westminster.
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Official portrait of Will Quince by Chris McAndrew / CC BY 3.0

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If you live off campus and in Colchester, this is the weekly update for your MP Will Quince’s activities in Parliament.

Speeches and contributions

Mr Quince spoke in one debate this week on the issue of support for care leavers. The debate took place in Westminster Hall and Mr Quince made a long speech in which he took one intervention. In the first half of his speech Mr Quince said the debate was ultimately about improving life chances for life chances. In the second half of his speech he went on to talk about housing benefit and housing needs of care leavers.

Votes

Will Quince voted ten times this week, all votes coming on the European Union (Withdrawal Bill). Half of the votes came on Tuesday and the other half came on Wednesday.

In his first vote he voted against a proposed amendment that would have made the repeals of the European Communities Act 1972 on the day the UK leaves the EU conditional on the Prime Minister gaining consent from the devolved legislatures. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his second vote he voted for on a question of whether the clause ensuring the repeal of the European Communities Act 1972 on exit day should stand part of the bill. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his third vote he voted against a clause that would ensure Ministers must set out in detail how other provisions in the bill would apply during a transitional period before the United Kingdom fully implements a withdrawal agreement. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his fourth vote he voted against a proposed amendment that would have made it so when interpreting EU law after exit day a court or tribunal would have to pay regard to any relevant decision of the European Court. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his fifth vote, his final one of Tuesday, Mr Quince voted against a proposed amendment that would have allowed for transactional arrangements within the existing structure of rules and regulations. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

[/cs_text][x_blockquote cite=”” type=”left” class=”quote”]”Will Quince voted ten times this week, all votes coming on the European Union (Withdrawal Bill).”[/x_blockquote][cs_text]

In his sixth vote of the week, and his first of Wednesday, the MP for Colchester voted against a proposed amendment new clause that would provide a mechanism for Ministers to establish a list of technical provisions of retained EU law that may be amended by subordinate legislation outside of the time restrictions of the Bill. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his seventh vote he voted against a proposed new clause that would ensure after exit day that EU derived employment rights, and various other things, could only be amended by primary legislation or subordinate legislation made under the Act itself. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his eight vote he voted against a proposed clause that would transfer EU Protocol on animal sentience into EU law so animals continue to be recognised as sentient beings under domestic law. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his ninth vote he voted against a new clause that would have ensured EU environmental principles continued to apply to the UK after exit day. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his tenth vote, his final of the week, Will Quince voted against a proposed amendment that would have inserted rights contained in a range of EU Articles and Protocols to the Bill. Mr Quince voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

Committee work

Mr Quince sits on the Home Affairs Select Committee. This week the Committee carried out an oral evidence session or its inquiry on policing for the future. During the session the Committee questioned Police and Crime Commissioners from across the country and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan. Mr Quince asked several questions to the witnesses during the session which you can read in full or watch here.

Expenses

The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority have released the latest batch of MP expenses data. The data covers the months May, June, and July of this year.

Mr Quince made 19 claims in this period, four of which came in May, thirteen came in June, and the remaining two came in July. His claims for this period totalled £2852.79. The most expensive of these claims was £541.67 for constituency office rent, this claim was made once in each month of the new data.

You can examine the details of all of Mr Quince’s expenses data here.

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Official Portrait of Mr Bernard Jenkin by Chris McAndrew / CC BY 3.0

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If you live on campus or in Wivenhoe, this is the weekly update for your MP Bernard Jenkin’s activities in Parliament.

Speeches and contributions

Mr Jenkin spoke many times in debates this week. He made an especially large number of contributions to the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill.

On Monday he spoke once on the topic of EU Exit negotiations to ask a question to the Brexit Secretary David Davis. He invited the Secretary of State to remind the House that when MPs voted for the withdrawal Bill they knew that after two years of negotiations the UK would leave the EU.

On Tuesday Mr Jenkin made a total of fifteen contributions to the debate. He made a long speech in which he granted many interventions from other Members of the House. His speech begins here.

On Thursday Mr Jenkin spoke in a debate on the new Independent Complaints and Grievances Policy intended to tackle harassment in Parliament. His first contribution was quickly interrupted by the Deputy Speaker who mistakenly called his at the wrong time. He was later called to speak and asked a long question to Speaker of the House, Andrea Leadsom following her statement to the House on the Independent Complaints and Grievances Policy.

Votes

Bernard Jenkin voted ten times this week, all votes coming on the European Union (Withdrawal Bill). Half of the votes came on Tuesday and the other half came on Wednesday.

In his first vote he voted against a proposed amendment that would have made the repeals of the European Communities Act 1972 on the day the UK leaves the EU conditional on the Prime Minister gaining consent from the devolved legislatures. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his second vote he voted for on a question of whether the clause ensuring the repeal of the European Communities Act 1972 on exit day should stand part of the bill. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his third vote he voted against a clause that would ensure Ministers must set out in detail how other provisions in the bill would apply during a transitional period before the United Kingdom fully implements a withdrawal agreement. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his fourth vote he voted against a proposed amendment that would have made it so when interpreting EU law after exit day a court or tribunal would have to pay regard to any relevant decision of the European Court. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his fifth vote, his final one of Tuesday, Mr Jenkin voted against a proposed amendment that would have allowed for transactional arrangements within the existing structure of rules and regulations. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his sixth vote of the week, and his first of Wednesday, the MP for Harwich and North Essex voted against a proposed amendment new clause that would provide a mechanism for Ministers to establish a list of technical provisions of retained EU law that may be amended by subordinate legislation outside of the time restrictions of the Bill. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

[/cs_text][x_blockquote cite=”” type=”left” class=”quote”]”On Thursday Mr Jenkin spoke in a debate on the new Independent Complaints and Grievances Policy intended to tackle harassment in Parliament. ”
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In his seventh vote he voted against a proposed new clause that would ensure after exit day that EU derived employment rights, and various other things, could only be amended by primary legislation or subordinate legislation made under the Act itself. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his eight vote he voted against a proposed clause that would transfer EU Protocol on animal sentience into EU law so animals continue to be recognised as sentient beings under domestic law. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his ninth vote he voted against a new clause that would have ensured EU environmental principles continued to apply to the UK after exit day. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

In his tenth vote, his final of the week, Bernard Jenkin voted against a proposed amendment that would have inserted rights contained in a range of EU Articles and Protocols to the Bill. Mr Jenkin voted with the majority and was loyal to the government.

Committee work

Mr Jenkin chairs the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Select Committee. The Committee carried out one oral evidence session this week for its inquiry into the work of the UK statistics Authority. The Committee asked questions to several witnesses including Sir David Norgrove, Chair of the UK Statistics Authority. The transcript of the hearing can be read here or watched in full here.

Expenses

The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority have released the latest batch of MP expenses data. The data covers the months May, June, and July of this year.

Mr Jenkin made 41 claims in this period, 18 of which came in May, 19 came in June, and the remaining 4 came in July. His claims for this period totalled £1431.65. The most expensive of these claims was £150.97 that came under office costs. The claim was for a Vodaphone Bill for his constituency office telephone rental.

You can examine the details of all of Mr Jenkin’s expenses data here.

Make sure to come back next week to read what your MPs have been working on.

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Rebel Essex
rebel@essex.ac.uk